Links

  • Audacity: Free, open source, cross-platform audio software.
  • BirdNET: Online software which allows you to upload an unknown bird sounds, identifying it species level with confidence levels. Particularly useful to help identify unknown nocmig birds.
  • British Library Sounds: An excellent resource for wildlife recordings, particularly for less common groups such as mammals and amphibians
  • Dodotronic: Suppliers of high-end, affordable sound-recording equipment, as used by Irish Wildlife Sounds. Highly recommendable with fantastic customer service.
  • Migració Nocturna: An excellent Catalan Nocmig resource, but relevant to all European enthusiasts.
  • Nocmig.com: A very useful resource hosted by Simon Gillings and Nick Moran, covering all aspects of passive recording of nocturnal migrants (birds).
  • Open Acoustic Devices: A UK-based company that design and produce open-source acoustic hardware, with their main product being the Audiomoth. Audiomoths are matchbox-sized autonomous recording units that can be stealthily placed in the wild to sound record passively. These are excellent tools for recording shy or secretive species.
  • Raven Lite: Free audio software, similar to Audacity. Perhaps more complex to use but produces nicer graphics.
  • The Sound Approach: Mark Constantine, Magnus Robb & Arnoud van den Berg, are pioneers in the field of bird sound. This excellent resource provides a wealth of information for those interested in bird vocalistions, with some particularly ground-breaking work on nocturnal flight calls.
  • Sound Birding: Homepage of French sound recordist – Stanislas Wroza, one of the pioneers of European bird sound-recording, with two books published in the field. His homepage is extremely informative for anyone wanting to learn more about sound recording birds.
  • Trektellen: Nocturnal and diurnal bird counts from monitoring stations throughout Europe. Particularly useful for nocmig enthusiasts.
  • Wildlife Sound Recording Society: Formed in 1968 with more than 300 members the WSRS webpage is a treasure trove of resources for wildlife sound recordists
  • Xeno-Canto: a community-based website to upload and share bird sounds from all over the world. The go-to page to learn and compare bird vocalisations on spec.